Posts tagged the new yorker

[no, thank you.]

[no, thank you.]

that sounds about right. 
[carolita johnson]

that sounds about right.

[carolita johnson]

[of interest.]

I’ve been resisting doing this, because I really shouldn’t be murdering time by reading so many unhelpful and extraneous articles, but I do. so here it is.

a captivating, heartbreaking story that will remind you of your youth, though it is probably nothing like your youth at all. so beautiful.

douglas preston researches the murders of seven couples, purportedly committed by a serial killer known as the monster of florence. during the course of his investigation, he becomes entangled with the story.

I know you’ve always wondered: if you’re shot in the head, do you feel it. now you know.

my dad worked for quite a while in manhattan, and one of the stories he likes it tell is about automats, so this one is for him.

a poignant story of a family living with mental illness. also, a story about love.

this american life appreciates radiolab.

q&a with jonathan safran foer. this will have to do until his next book is published. sigh.

as an admitted fan of jonah lehrer’s work, I’m not entirely sure I care all that much about his reuse of his own work. how are you all feeling about that?

guess who joined the new yorker. big day!

[I want to go back to how things were before we knew each other.]
today I let go of a friend, accepted that things have been irreparably damaged, sought closure. perhaps I’ll now be happier. perhaps we’ll both be able to move on in our own directions. perhaps now things will be better.

[I want to go back to how things were before we knew each other.]

today I let go of a friend, accepted that things have been irreparably damaged, sought closure. perhaps I’ll now be happier. perhaps we’ll both be able to move on in our own directions. perhaps now things will be better.

Tell me, what else can’t I do, so I can go ahead and get those out of the way.
dallas wiens [via the new yorker]

[of interest.]

to begin: a fascinating article about the history of the elevator (I can’t believe I just typed those words), including reassuring information about the structural design and safety features of modern elevators.

who needs grad school when you can suffer a brain injury that releases previously buried savant-like capabilities? I have to admit, after reading this article, a small part of me wished for a similar fate.

in an effort to prepare for a life of student loan repayments, here’s how to make the most of the tiniest apartment. moveable walls, hidden storage, and filtered air. pretty neat. I wonder how I can entice the designer, Graham Hill, to renovate my future apartment.

sometimes it feels like our 20s were designed for reevaluating everything about ourselves and our choices: where we live, how we spend out money, who we go out with on Friday night, who we wake up next to on Saturday morning. it turns out that feeling will likely extend well beyond these years. will we ever stop wondering whether the choices we’ve made are the right ones?

you don’t have to stop learning just because you’re no longer in school. lots of schools, including Harvard and MIT (which has, admittedly, made course lectures available for free for quite a while) are providing free online classes. check them out!

I was recently chatting with a friend about Jonah Lehrer’s new book on creativity, and she mentioned a chapter about how loss, sadness, and/or depression can promote creativity. if you aren’t unhappy, don’t worry, though: there are other ways to enhance your creativity.

switched at birth + twins = learning your sister is someone else’s twin.

a note from the Culture Desk of The New Yorker on bank security questions:

If you could travel anywhere in the world, wouldn’t that be great?
On what day are you going to die?
Who is your favorite Wu-Tang Clan member, excluding O.D.B., Ghostface, Rza, Gza, Raekwon, and Method Man?
What is Mario Lopez’s greatest asset?
Hey, remember Deion Sanders?
He was the best.
So what do you bench?
Squat?
What about pull-ups? How many pull-ups can you do?

Tonight, while applying for jobs, I came across this excellent list. The chance that I remember the answers to zero of these questions is very high.
[if you want to log in to my Scholastic Publishing Careers account and apply for a job for me, get in touch and I’ll send over the answers to these questions right away. if I can recall them.]

a note from the Culture Desk of The New Yorker on bank security questions:

If you could travel anywhere in the world, wouldn’t that be great?

On what day are you going to die?

Who is your favorite Wu-Tang Clan member, excluding O.D.B., Ghostface, Rza, Gza, Raekwon, and Method Man?

What is Mario Lopez’s greatest asset?

Hey, remember Deion Sanders?

He was the best.

So what do you bench?

Squat?

What about pull-ups? How many pull-ups can you do?

Tonight, while applying for jobs, I came across this excellent list. The chance that I remember the answers to zero of these questions is very high.

[if you want to log in to my Scholastic Publishing Careers account and apply for a job for me, get in touch and I’ll send over the answers to these questions right away. if I can recall them.]

of interest.

following the Supreme Court’s ruling that anyone who has been arrested may be strip searched prior to admission to jail, Slate provides a guide to proper strip-search technique.

after last week’s post about Kerry Max Cook, you’re probably wondering how forensic DNA testing works. now you know, in under two minutes.

ladies, what it’s like to donate your eggs, and what they might not tell you.

what do you consider to be the purpose of the universe? is there any purpose at all?

the most interesting aspect of the new release of Titanic is that Neil deGrasse Tyson corrected the images of the sky such that the stars are seen as they would have been at that time (winter, 1912).

remember when you stayed up for twenty-four hours straight, watching all the episodes of studio 60 in a row? check out the trailer for (and WNYC’s coverage of) Aaron Sorkin’s new show, The Newsroom.

real-life Hunger Games in North Korea.

Kurt Vonnegut’s eight tips on how to write a great story are the perfect.

an article about Tonya Harding before she was better known as Nancy Kerrigan’s attacker.

an argument to convince you to start smoking. or, if you’re going to continue to stubbornly protect the health of the tiny bronchioles within your perfectly pink lungs, you could read here about why you should at least not be so concerned that others aren’t as careful.

I totally trust the New Yorker to advise me on ways to prevent or eliminate my hangover.