Posts tagged beautiful

[that dress.]

[that dress.]

[for the past six months or so, I’ve been seriously considering  getting a tattoo — one or a series of stars, for a nickname my friends  gave me in college. I’ve been thinking, maybe, three stars that begin  just below my shoulder blade and curve around my ribcage to just above  my hip, like that peacock feather. not too big — maybe the size of  quarters. I have two scars in the area of the eye of the feather, and it might be nice to  disguise them a bit. what are your thoughts on tattoos? do you have any?  plans to get one/some?]

[for the past six months or so, I’ve been seriously considering getting a tattoo — one or a series of stars, for a nickname my friends gave me in college. I’ve been thinking, maybe, three stars that begin just below my shoulder blade and curve around my ribcage to just above my hip, like that peacock feather. not too big — maybe the size of quarters. I have two scars in the area of the eye of the feather, and it might be nice to disguise them a bit. what are your thoughts on tattoos? do you have any? plans to get one/some?]

[why do I run? to make it to that point way out there where it feels like you’re standing in the middle of the water.]

[why do I run? to make it to that point way out there where it feels like you’re standing in the middle of the water.]

[once I went to an aquarium.]

The Legacy of Wes Leonard

[I wish I could write like this. if this is not one of the most beautifully written introductions, I don’t know what is. and yes, I did sob through the entire article.]

After the autopsy, when the doctor found white blossoms of scar tissue on Wes Leonard’s heart, he guessed they had been secretly building there for several months. That would mean Wes’s heart was slowly breaking throughout the Fennville Blackhawks’ 2010-11 regular season, when he led them in scoring and the team won 20 games without a loss.

It would mean his heart was already moving toward electrical meltdown in December, when he scored 26 on Decatur with that big left shoulder clearing a path to the hoop. It would mean his heart swelled and weakened all through January (25 against Hopkins, 33 against Martin) even as it pumped enough blood to fill at least 10 swimming pools.

This heart pounded two million times in February, probably more, heaving under its own weight, propelling Wes’s 6’2”, 230-pound frame along the glimmering hardwood with such precision and force that finally a kid from Hartford gave up on the rules and tackled him in the lane. By March 3, the night of Wes’s last and most glorious game, his heart weighed 21½ ounces, double the weight of a normal heart, and it gave him all he needed from the opening tip to the final buzzer. Then the wiring failed, the current going as jagged as a thunderbolt, and Wes fell to the floor with his big heart quivering.”